Press Release - 11-14-2018

DMV News

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 14, 2018

Contacts:
Lisa Koumjian
Lisa.Koumjian@dmv.ny.gov

Tim O’Brien
Tim.OBrien@dmv.ny.gov

 

DMV, GTSC, DOT, STATE POLICE AND THRUWAY AUTHORITY
URGE NEW YORKERS TO MOVE OVER FOR ROADSIDE WORKERS

National Traffic Incident Response Awareness Week is November 11-17

The New York State Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV), the Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee (GTSC), the State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), State Police and the State Thruway Authority reminded motorists today of the importance of moving over for first responders and others who assist with motor vehicle crashes and other roadside incidents.

This reminder comes as part of the second annual National Traffic Incident Response Awareness Week, November 11-17. The awareness week was created by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to spotlight the dangers emergency responders face while responding to traffic incidents.

Terri Egan, DMV Executive Deputy Commissioner and Acting GTSC Chair, said,The people who work alongside our roads have a tough job to do. Moving over prevents crashes and keeps both motorists and roadside workers safe. These workers should be able to concentrate on the important work they are doing, rather than worrying that a driver might strike them.”

New York State Department of Transportation Acting Commissioner Paul A. Karas said, “Emergency responders, including NYSDOT HELP truck crews, often put themselves at risk to assist the public. We urge all motorists to abide by New York’s Move Over Law and give emergency personnel the space they need to carry out their vital work. Ensuring public safety is always a top priority at NYSDOT and should be a priority for all drivers.”

Thruway Authority Executive Director Matthew J. Driscoll said, “The men and women who work alongside our roadways are just doing their jobs to keep roads safe for all motorists. Moving over is not just a courtesy, it’s the law. Anytime you see flashing lights, vests and reflectors you should Slow Down and Move Over when it is safe to do so to ensure our employees are safe and get to go home to their families each night.”

New York State Police Superintendent George P. Beach II said, "We remain committed to highway safety for travelers as well as the first responders and maintenance crews who are out working each day.  We want to remind all drivers to slow down and move over when you see an emergency vehicle or maintenance crew on the shoulder of a road. Stay alert and put your electronic devices away. Troopers will continue to strictly enforce the Move Over Law, and violators will be ticketed.”

New York’s “Move Over” Law requires cars to move over, if they can safely do so, for police, firefighters, ambulance workers, tow-truck drivers and other personnel as they work at crash scenes. Motorists are similarly required to move when construction and maintenance vehicles are stopped alongside roads.

The law was expanded in July 2016 to include volunteer firefighter and ambulance workers, and in November 2016 to include sanitation vehicles such as garbage and recycling trucks.

Since the law was first enacted in 2011, almost 107,000 people have been ticketed for failing to move over. So far in 2018, 12,775 tickets have been issued. The penalty for violating the Move Over law is a fine of up to $150, or jail time of up to 15 days, or both. It also counts for 2 points on a driver license.

The Department of Transportation and Governor's Traffic Safety Committee produced a video advising motorists to Steer It, Clear It in appropriate situations, such as after minor collisions. You can view that video here.

 

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